Posts by Author - Geilt

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The Long and Short of it: Short-Term Health Insurance

Monday, October 11th, 2010

What is it?

Although you might think a couple months without health insurance is nothing to worry about, there is always a possibility of an accident or illness that could be financially devastating. Accidents happen, and taking measures against their detrimental effects is critical; this is why health insurance is a necessary safeguard. Short-term health insurance typically has the same benefits as a major medical plan, but is designed to specifically protect you against unforeseen illness or injury. Thus, preventative care is usually not included. (more…)

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Limited Indemnity

Monday, June 14th, 2010

Limited indemnity health insurance covers the essentials: emergency treatment and hospitalization. Unlike other types of health insurance, there are no limitations on which doctors, specialists, or hospitals you can visit. The downside is that you will be responsible for a significant co-insurance percentage of those costs (after the deductible that must be paid up front before coverage kicks in), which tends to be high), and you will often need to file claims yourself.

It is far less comprehensive than major medical coverage. For example, preventative care services may not be included. However, it is far less expensive on a monthly basis, and will protect against financial hardship due to serious health issues. As a result, limited indemnity coverage is best for those who are healthy and relatively young, yet have a tight budget. Many student health insurance options are limited indemnity plans.

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Copayment

Monday, June 14th, 2010

Co-payments are an important part of the cost of any health insurance plan. A co-payment is the fixed amount you will pay for a particular service.

Co-payments can be charged for the following:

  • Filling a prescription
  • Visiting a doctor
  • Having a blood or other medical test done

These amounts can vary from as little as $5 or $10, to as much as $40. In most cases, a lower monthly premium comes with more expensive co-payments.

In addition, most co-payments only apply when you are in-network. If you choose to go outside of the provider network for health care, you may instead be responsible for a percentage of the bill.

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Don’t let COBRA strike while GI is Ready for Action

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

(Image: millermz under CC 2.0)

Whenever you have trouble with searching for health insurance, dont forget GI (Guaranteed Issue) is there. Don’t let COBRA be your only resort. COBRA is high cost health insurance offered by employers when you have been “let go”. Never fear GI insurance is a cost effective alternative health insurance for those of you deemed “uninsurable”. GI Takes the daunting task of insuring those with various conditions that would otherwise be turned away.

GI is, of course, not nearly as effective as Major Medical insurance, but for an affordable short term health insurance solution, or until you find new employment, GI can protect you from the dangers of COBRA; the dangers of not being able to afford your health insurance while you are unemployed or seeking work.

Don’t take your health insurance search lightly, bring in reinforcements, the agents at VitalOne are always armed to the teeth with health insurance plans ready for almost any situation. Their rigorous training and expert skills will help you find the right GI insurance for those with any condition. Send for reinforcements today!

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iPad in Healthcare: Expensive, Limited, Hyped

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

(Image: matt buchanan under CC 2.0)

Thomas Goetz of the Healthcare Blog writes about a device that hasn’t even been released yet as a boon to the healthcare industry. The iPad is a new device by Apple that resembles an over-sized iPod. With the popularity of netbooks on the rise, Apple is attempting to revive the concept of a tablet; a keyboardless touchscreen computer concept that has been hailed as evolutionary and even “magical”.

So, whats the big deal with the iPad? Portability, ease of use and standardization of a concept. Unfortunately with that also comes the price of the brand.

Many of you may have noticed the devices most medical professionals use in hospitals and offices. Most aren’t standard. Every professional uses some sort of PDA, or communications device that as a whole varies from one hospital to the other. This is because there is no standard and many of these locations use custom built and proprietary software and systems that make it difficult to integrate with new services due to a lack of API or lack of flexibility in exporting data or interfacing with the devices.

Apple will be no different. Here you will have a device that interfaces optimally with other Apple products, whereas most hospitals are using PC’s (affordability). Not only that, but with the price point of Apple systems and Apple software we are definitely not going to come any closer to affordable health insurance when hospitals have to pay the hefty bills to refit their entire offices and staff with apple products.

Besides the iPhone, because of its very low price point, Apple products really aren’t practical for a business or healthcare environment. Even the old adage “Apples’ are good for graphics and design” isn’t necessarily true. Apple’s now run the same hardware that PC’s do. The only difference is they cling to a system with a very user friendly UI and limited software compatibility. And really, with people having trouble affording health insurance plans, would you really want to sit around your hospital watching people using apple products and wondering why your health insurance rates, and hospital bill, are so high?

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Measuring Healthcare Progress by Drug Use

Thursday, February 18th, 2010

Mary Marcus of USA TODAY writes: “A boom in medical technology over the past decade or two has led to a surge in certain medical tests and increased prescription drug use, say authors of a report that provides a snapshot of Americans’ health today.” Although these are seen as positive results, they are indeed interpretive. Just because people who have affordable health insurance plans through major health insurance companies such as United Healthcare and Aetna are able to be prescribed and use drugs does not mean that Americans are healthier.

Indeed, it could indicate that Americans are actually addicted to healthcare services and commercial drugs. This is not a completely malignant addiction but one that is authorized by the government and drives a multi-billion dollar industry. It scares me to think that we can look at statistics such as how many drugs are used daily or monthly and project that we are healthier. We become ever more dependent upon drugs and hence drug manufacturers for our daily living and “correction” of errors in the body. Where could all these problems that require so many drugs come from?

It is possible that the answer is more related to diet and sedentary lifestyle than a “lack of drugs”. It is purely opinion of course but most of us know that when we start down the balancing path of drug use we can easily find ourselves with an ambulatory in our homes filled with products designed to counter the side effects of every other product we are taking.

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